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Archive for July, 2009

Interesting article on accidents caused in the aviation and medical industries where people notice deadly problems but don’t convey the seriousness to other team members out of politeness or deferring to a senior team mate. For example:

Korean Air Flight 801, almost the same exact situation as Air Florida. In trying to warn the captain of severe weather problems that would eventually lead to the deaths of 228 of the 254 people on board, the first officer says, “Don’t you think it rains more? In this area, here?” and “Captain, the weather radar has helped us a lot”…

Captain, the weather radar has helped us a lot?! What are these people doing? They’re hinting at the impending problem, in hopes that the guy who’s a little busy with the whole “flying an airplane” or “trying to bring 99 planes circling Kennedy airport in for a landing” thing is going to catch on, read their mind, and solve the problem for them self.

The official term for this is “mitigated speech” and Malcolm Gladwell provides a fascinating account of how it has effected the airline industry in his book Outliers. He defines it as “any attempt to downplay or sugarcoat the meaning of what is being said.” and explains that “we mitigate when we’re being polite, or when we’re ashamed or embarrassed, or when we’re being deferential to authority.”

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